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20121206
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. you will see the united nations get -- get a united states shot on the arms control treaties that the united nations launch and they will supercede the constitution of the united states. that's where they're headed. >> oh, my god! >> this from the guy who sent weapons to the iranians, funding right wing death squads. and lied about it all. >> very glenn beckish right? going to be a world government. united nations is going to be -- you know, dictating american law and things like that. look, all of the crazy talk they did for the first four years and then we had election -- the american people said yeah, we like that guy. none of this is -- i think they're going to spin the tales for four more years because they sound, for that echochamber it sounds fun. >> stephanie: ben stein on o'reilly. >> a lot of angry, bitter people out there. they've got to attack something. so they attack christmas. they're not -- i don't consider them well in the head. >> what! >> nobody is being forced to bow down and worship anybody.
last 22 years to find out how we did it, what they can do. so here was the united nations who said okay, we'll come up with a convention, a treaty, all countries, put it out for them to sign up which encourages them to pale actually emulate what we did. this would have given us a seat at the table. we would be sitting at the table, helping other countries to bring their laws more up to what ours are in terms of the rights of people with disabilities. but we turned our backs on that. turned our backs on it. you know, mr. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barrier
this afternoon in the united nations general assembly. palestine palestinians are asking to be upgraded to nonmember state. if it passes it is a u.n. recognition of palestine statehood. mahmoud abass is in new york to witness the vote. the united states, israel and other western countries oppose this move by the palestines. palestinians. more than a dozen european countries are supporting this rez lug. the uk says it may vote yes pending a couple of conditions. the u.s. has supported a two-state resolution for palestinians and israelis. why do american officials oppose u.n. recognition? >> for the most part it won't give the palestinians what they want, which is an actual state. this vote is largely symbolic. it would have no effect on the palestinian sovereignty or borders or any of the things they're looking for. israel is vehemently opposed to this vote. it said it threatened to cut off aid to the palestinians, impose new checkpoints if they do so. what the u.s. is fearing here is that if this vote goes ahead, and we see that it's pretty much a guarantee that it will -- that the pale
of a strong speech he gave at the united nations last month denouncing mass rape and impunity in congo. mr. president, the united nations has 20,000 member peacekeeping force in eastern congo to help the region's violence. the area is still very fragile. awash in weapons, warlords and competing regional interests but it's also rich in minerals that are found in our everyday electronics and cell phones. it's been said that congo war contains wars within wars and that's true, but fueling much of this violence is a bloody contest for control of these minerals. in the last congress i was proud to join in a bipartisan effort with senators brownback and others to protect the country's mineral wealth from fueling the region's horrific violence. the bill we passed asked for transparency from companies using these minerals and it has to be approved, i was happy to see in august that the securities and exchange commission approved the rule. it's a sound and fair rule. it was disappointed when the national association of manufacturers in the united states say they've already targeted this rule for a
this into an abortion debate is wrong on substance and bad politics. as to the united nations, i've heard people people say that ratifying the convention would take decisions out of parents' hands and let the u.n. or the federal government decide what's best for our children and that's just wrong. the treaty doesn't give the federal government or any state government new powers. with regard to children with disabilities and the treaty cannot be used as a basis for a lawsuit in state or federal court. former attorney general dick thornburgh made this crystal clear in his testimony before the senate foreign relations committee and in every conversation i've had with him. i would support the treaty if -- i wouldn't support the treaty if it were any other way. let's take a step back and look how this looks if america jeects this treaty. china has joined, russia has joined. we are the country that set the standards on rights for the -- of the disabled. we want everybody to play by international rules. we lose credibility if we turn around and refuse to participate in a treaty that merely asks other nations
to maintain that freedom. we don't want the united nations control oferte internet. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlelady fromtown tfpblet mrs. blackburn: thank you, mr. speaker. we have no further speakers, and as i close i want to thank ms. eshoo for the leadership that she has given. she's the ranking member of the telecommunications and internet subcommittee. i also want to draw attention to the outstanding work that representative mary bono mack did as she led the debate and the discussion and pushed for the resolution authored the resolution that the house passed earlier on this very issue. i also want to thank her for her work with senator rubio and having a resolution that would be agreed to by both chambers. as ms. eshoo indicated errier, the senate resolution makes a technical change, a small technical change in the resolution that was passed by the house. . this is where the u.s. needs to stand firm. it's how we can stand firm for freedom. i encourage the passage of this resolution, and i encourage that we as a body
the united nation's reviews much more than that. i [inaudible] >> before anyone can make an intelligent decision regarding someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more for the state. we don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said tonight at the attack has been shared with congress says that this day. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends thought like john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision qualification. john bolton the ambassador and democrats talk in their fields saying we're not going to vote, not going to consider this nomination until they get basic answers to our concerns. .. >> we are now live with condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to
misleading, but just to be clear, when you have a position where your and ambassador to the united nations, you go well beyond classified talking points in your daily responsibilities, and that is troubling to me as well, i am a person that got -- does not know anything about this and i am going on every single show. is part of our responsibility as an ambassador to the united nations to review much more than that. >> before anybody could make an intelligent decision about someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more. we don't have to see the fbi interviews of the survivors to know that -- will have the basic information about what was said and shared in congress as of this day. i remember the episode very well. it did not have the information to make informed decisions about john bolton the ambassador, and democrats dug in their heels saying we are not going to vote or consider this nomination until we get basic answers to our concerns. all i can tell you is the concerns i had are greater today than they were before. we are not even close to getting the basic answers. >> i have
was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation. so winning the civil rights a precondition of winning the liberty across the globe. no i think looking from the outside if you'll forgive me, the same danger now. go to china and i criticize them for the lack of democracy. but they say yes, they are educating all of their people. in the middle east and i talked to people there on the edge of radicalism. they say look at the -- [inaudible] justices in your british and european and ame
afghanistan under taliban control and is wanted by the united nations for possible war crimes. next we have mohammed nawi, another one of the individuals held at guantanamo bay. eats tied to a 2002 attack that killed two americans and he maintains loyalty to al qaeda. and let's be clear. many of the individuals who are being held at guantanamo bay right now, there is a 28% recidivism rate of those we have released back to foreign nationals who have gotten back into the battle against our country. these are individuals who have not renounced the war on terror. those that we are holding at guantanamo bay, those that we have released the recidivism record speaks for itself. they've gotten into the battle, they still want to be involved in terrorist activities, they still want to be a member of al qaeda or other terrorist groups and commit acts against our country and our allies. and, again, mohammed nabi is tied to a tack that killed two americans. he maintains loyalty to al qaeda and yet some of my colleagues, if you think about it, would insist other amendments we're dealing with today, that
of the united states. he's the steward of the nation's finances. he's got a responsibility to everyone to work out an agreement, and that means he's got to come up with something that can get through a republican house of representatives. so we're waiting on the president. we can still get there. but he's going to have to lead, and he can start by putting the campaign talking points on the shelf. i know that whacking the rich works politically. it worked pretty well for him in his campaign. i get it. but the election's over. it's time to lead. now, mr. president, on an entirely different subject, yesterday was an extremely happy day for my alma mater, the university of louisville. and i want to talk today about an extraordinary individual who's really achieved an incredible success. at my university over the last 15 years. it's been my privilege during my career to get to know a number of people in all walks of life who have been highly successful. however, i am hard pressed to think of a more conspicuous example of success than what tom jurij accomplished for the university of louisville for
: remember that, kids. >> gretchen: okay. let's get to your headlines now because the united nations overwhelmingly voting for the first time to recognize the state of palestine. sounds of people celebrating on the west bank. the general assembly officially changed the palestinian status from u.n. observer -- did you know they had all these terms? they're not an otherrer. now they're a nonmember observer state. the united states and israel both voting against it. >> palestine is not a state. that's a fact. when the u.n. engages in this kind of activity, it just shows a real lack of administration commitment to stop it from happening. >> gretchen: israeli prime minister netanyahu says that the vote violates past agreements. >> brian: getting the sense we were outvoted? frustrations boiling over for cents in staten island, new york, who went begging fema for help in the wake of super storm sandy. they got no heat and nowhere to live and felt their calls were unanswered. >> you sit there and laugh! you think it's a jo
in syria, possibly even today in that devastating area. certainly perfect partner at the united nations for four years in diligent, excellent, astute, thoughtful, and patriotic service has been susan e. rice, a daughter of washington, d.c., and parents who loved america. a graduate of stanford university where, of course, she earned department honors and university distinction. became a harry s. truman scholar, phi beta kappa, and rhodes scholarship. certainly a beginning that did not warrant the kind of personal attacks that we have seen. i think we should leave politics and campaigns and won or lost races to november 6, 2012. for you cannot debate a political and presidential campaign around a patriotic public servant. if there is a nomination for ambassador rice, the senate has every right to advise and consent and the votes need to be taken on up and down. i can assure you that if she is nominated by the president, she will serve this nation well. as she has done in the past. i know her well as the assistant secretary for african affairs under the clinton administration. dealing wit
of those reasons, among others, it would not be in the national security interests of the united states. that achievement would jeopardize u.s. national security interests, would pose an existential threat to the state of israel and would result in a regional nuclear arms race that would further destabilize the region. the news out of iran is dire. just this week, the director of the international atomic energy administration told the press that iran has not slowed its enrichment activities. the international atomic energy administration also suspects that iran has conducted live tests of conventional explosives that could be used to detonate a nuclear weapon at the military base, the facility the iranians have denied access to by the international atomic energy administration. between may and august of this year, iran doubled the number of centrifuges at its fortified facility buried deep inside a mountain to protect it against strikes. iran now has over 2,140 centrifuges for enriching uranium, and it continues to enrich to 20%. iran claims it needs this higher grade uranium for its pe
lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: vote: vote: the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 61, the nays are 38, two-thirds of the senators present not having voted in the affirmative, the resolution of ratification is not agreed to. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: both senator mcconnell and i have approv
of the largest national organization of dreamers, united we dream. they will be planning their next effort, advocating for immigration reform legislation that will bring them and their families out of the shadows once and for all and give them a chance to earn their way to legal status and citizen thp in america. -- citizenship in america. one part of this immigration reform, the dream act is near and dear to me but i want to see comprehensive immigration reform before it is over. we know if we pass the dream act, it will help the economy, creating new jobs and economic growth when the talent of these young people, as they come out of high school and college is brought in our economy. in my home state of illinois, by 2030 the dream act will contribute $14 billion in economic activity, and dreamers would create up to 58,992 new jobs. i come to the floor to tell their stories. they used to hide in the shadows. they didn't want to talk about who they were because they were undocumented and afraid to be deported. many were deported. but i came to the floor to tell the stories of those who had
. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her on behalf of all of our colleagues in the house, especially the washington dedication. and this -- passage of this bill is dedicated to her family and to the united states park service. i urge passage of h.r.
, with the wrong skin color? the beauty of our constitution is that it gives everyone in the united states basic due process rights to a trial by a jury of their peers. that is what makes this nation great. as justice sandra day o'connor wrote for the plurality in hamdi v. rumsfeld, and i vote -- "as critical as the government's interest may be in detaining those who actually pose an immediate threat to the national security of the united states during ongoing international conflict, history and common sense teach us that an unchecked system of detention carries the potential to become a means for oppression and abuse of others who do not present that sort of threat." i mean, just think of it. if you were of the wrong race and you were in a place where there was an attack, you were picked up, you could be held without charge or trial month after month, year after year, that's wrong. experiences over the last decade prove the country is safer now than before the 9/11 attacks. terrorists are behind bars. dangerous plots have been thwarted. the system is working, and hopefully improving each day. s
but the united states of america is held together by a great national creed not by ethnicity or blood or religion, our national creed is an aspiration will narrative that it doesn't matter where you came from. it matters where you are going. you can come from homeless circumstances and do great things and the only way that is true is if you have access to a high-quality education and if it ever becomes the case as it is increasingly now, as i said many times i can look at your zip code and the social fabric of this country has no chance to hold together and we will be picked one against the other and those who are capable and those who are not. those who are employable and those who are not. i can assure you that you might not be able to control your circumstances but you can control your response to your circumstances. that will no longer be the way americans think about themselves or each other and that gives way to entitlements. at core, the real problem for us in national security is not just our competitiveness abroad, the great national narrative, this cohesion that has made us the country
are fighting against a national clean energy policy in the united states, guess what. china has a very, very focused and intense strategy. for example china's finance ministry announced it would set aside up to $321 million each year for clean energy electric vehicle research and development. just for those kind of cars. just for research and development. now, they're doing a heck of a lot more. for a closer look at what american electric car policies should be, we're bringing on lisa, the author of the book "oil on the brain," petroleum's long, strange trip to your tank. she comes us to from new york where she's a senior research fellow at the new america foundation. lisa, thank you so much for joining us inside "the war room." >> thank you. >> jennifer: all right. so let me get right to it because you're the expert. what is the most important public policy that america should adopt to promote electriification of vehicles? >> i think there's two things. one thing we should do is really make the cars available to p
, it's worth that to families across the united states. for the good of this nation, for the good of the economy, for the good of these working families, for goodness sakes, pass this measure, this bipartisan measure that passed the senate last july. get this part done. we can debate the rest, but give peace of mind to meese working families and -- but give peace of mind to these working families and middle-income families that they're not going it see their income tax go up. madam president, i yield the floor. madam president, i ask unanimous consent to speak on a separate issue to be placed in a separate place in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: madam president, it was a disappointing day yesterday when the united states senate failed by five votes to pass the convention on disabilities. it is a measure that i'd worked on with former california congressman tony coehlo, who has been an outstanding advocate for the disabled in america. throughout his career in congress and since. but it was also an effort toker one particular end -- for one particu
to their countries to build those nations, and we want that to continue. we want them to come to the united states of america and go back to their country and foster democracy and good will. so many of them do that. but not all the 29,000 stay here. so what happens? you eliminate 50,000 visas. you say we're going to give you 55,000. you know you only can use 29,000. it's a net loss. the people on the other side of the aisle keep telling us, why don't they come through the legal way? why don't they come through the legal way? why do they always have to go under, around? they should come here legally. because we're for legal immigration. not today you're for legal immigration, because in the end you reduce the ability of people to come legally to the united states of america, and that is the diversity program, a program that allows. and lastly, let me just be very, very clear. . when we look at this and talk about the continent of africa, we think it's important that every continent of the world be able to come here and contribute to the great nation that is because that is the diversity in the grea
the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's next general riggs of explorers, space is their destiny and he'll help ensure that they reach it. ralph, there's a lot of work to do and i'm truly honored by the opportunity to serve with you an get it done. i only hope and pray when i'm 65 years old that bill in half as good shape or half as active as you. mr. smith: i yield to minutes to the gentleman from texas, quico canseco. mr. canseco: i thank my friend and colleague for yielding to me. i rise to honor a great man, a great texan, and a great american, ralph
disadvantages to the canadian economy and disappearance as canada as a nation. they took a bit of a credibility hit on that because that did not come to pass. this is a turning point. canadians saw that we had a deep trade relationship with the united states before that, but it grew. it has not impacted our ability to be independent. it has resulted in vast increases in economic opportunity for canadians and canadian families. that is the difference. we went through a traumatic and cathartic exercise -- the canadian people decided. that has invalidated by history. i watched what is happening in the u.s. very closely. i would agree with a surprising amount of protectionism on both sides of the political divide. in this country, it is very different. protectionist discord on the right is virtually nonexistent. on the left, they complain -- campaign against trade. they purport to be for it. they know they cannot win the broader argument. canada is making a decision. this is a small, open a economy. it is a trade dependent economy. more than the united states. individual trade decisions can be cont
a former chief justice of the connecticut supreme court, a former united states attorney, several partners at major connecticut and national law firms, an academic, business leaders and community leaders throughout the state. their insights and hard work throughout the process were really invaluable to my colleague from connecticut and i, and i express on this floor my gratitude to them for their service. based on the work of the advisory panel and our review of its recommendations, senator blumenthal and i recommended michael shea to the president for nomination. i will say that michael was ranked very high among the applicants, highly qualified applicants for this position by all members of the advisory panel, and i should say here right at the outset that we are grateful to president obama for nominating him for this place on our court. michael shea is a native of west hartford, connecticut, a graduate of amherst college and yale law school, served as a clerk to judge james buckley, though a resident of connecticut, sat on the u.s. court of appeals for the district of columbia. michael
over time. and it is the slow defense of the united states that is the real risk. the fiscal cliff is something that can be fixed fairly easily. >> host: finally, i would like to go back, david rothkopf come to your comments about government. national government being neanderthal it. there was a throwaway line of sight while we are still organized as nation states economically. again, where we going in the future. >> i think we will see the future. because we live in geographic proximity to one another, we also have city governments, state governments in the united states, we have a federal government in the united states and it's only natural that another layer of government that deals with issues of loss. but over the course of the next hundred years from the lives of our children and grandchildren, we will see progress with it. the big question is whether the balance between the power of those public entities and big private enterprises that are the size of most of the biggest countries in the world. it also remains unbalanced. right now, our future is being determined in financ
and protecting our national security. the united states has and ought to have a zero tolerance policy against government employees and contractor personnel engaging in any form of human trafficking. these values are transcendent of party lines, of any other interests. i'm very proud to offer this amendment, in fact, with strong support across the aisle led by my colleague, senator portman, who has joined me in forming a human trafficking caucus to lead the way on these issues, and this amendment is a result of efforts that we have led and very simply represents the most comprehensive legislative effort ever undertaken in the united states congress to stamp out human trafficking in overseas contracting and i am happy to yield to my colleague from ohio, senator portman. mr. portman: thank you, mr. president. i'm pleased to join my colleague from connecticut in offering this amendment which is modeled on this legislation that he talked about. it is bipartisan that we introduced in march along with a number of senators on both sides of the aisle. we also recently joined together to form a senate
to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, november 30, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will resume consideration of the defense authorization act. there will be four roll call votes at 9:30 a.m. i ask unanimous consent that all votes after the first vote be 10 minutes in duration. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, this week something rare occurred here in the senate. we debated a bill under regular order. no filibusters were mounted, no cloture motions were filed on the motion to proceed. th
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)